Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Username: Password:
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down

Author Topic: November Trout  (Read 133 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

jeffsod

  • Baby effin Wheel Kid
  • *******
  • Karma: +1/-1
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1929
  • Newbie
November Trout
« on: November 21, 2017, 05:18:49 PM »

Just reviewing the freshwater reports I realized I haven't posted any from this fall yet. I have been fishing after work and getting out usually at least once on the weekends. I guess the lack of reports is due to the lack luster fishing. I don't know if it is the unusually warm weather in October or if the state stocked fewer trout this fall but it has not been as good as the last two years.

That said I am still getting fish and this past weekend I hit one of my favorite fall spots in SE MA that usually has some good sized midges. I opted to fish Saturday as Sunday's winds were forecasted to be very strong and that was spot on.

Fishing started slow but about three o'clock the sun popped out just long enough to get some more adult midges to hatch out of the pond and the fish responded. Nothing too crazy but it turned around a slow afternoon of fishing. In the end I got three fish. The first was a surprise holdover brookie that was quite lean. Then I got two rainbows. Both were nice. The second was very nicely marked probably a male with spawn colors.

An emerging midge pattern got the first two and I was fishing my midge pattern like a wet fly for the third. Took the third in the fading light Saturday evening.

The photos below are from Saturday. I have some more photos I will add of other recent trips later...


Logged

k2

  • Baby effin Wheel Kid
  • *******
  • Karma: +6/-1
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1444
  • fan of the rainbrown
Re: November Trout
« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2017, 06:38:19 PM »

Those are some quality trout.  Great job keeping the season going.
Logged

Chris M

  • Propeller Assassin
  • Administrator
  • Baby effin Wheel Kid
  • *****
  • Karma: +4/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3400
Re: November Trout
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2017, 08:30:48 AM »

Nice Jeff   I agree on the lackluster fall fishing and I attribute to a warm fall

Though the colors looked bleached out on the first fish, it kind of looks tiger troutish
Logged

jeffsod

  • Baby effin Wheel Kid
  • *******
  • Karma: +1/-1
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1929
  • Newbie
Re: November Trout
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2017, 08:39:18 AM »


Yes, that first fish was pretty dull in coloration. I think it was more an indicator of its health. Every tiger trout I have caught has fought like hell that brookie did not fight too hard. I knew right away it was something different as when you catch rainbows all the time this fish was clearly not fighting as hard as one of them.If you expand the photos and look at the lower fins though the markings are there as was the noticeable 'teeth' in the mouth of a brookie
Logged

jeffsod

  • Baby effin Wheel Kid
  • *******
  • Karma: +1/-1
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1929
  • Newbie
Re: November Trout
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2017, 09:22:02 AM »

Following up with some more belated reports as promised.

These were taken on a late afternoon midweek outing a couple of weeks ago on my way off cape I swung into one of the cape's premier trout ponds for an hour and a half and just so happen to hit it just right. Timing is as they say everything.

The cape has had a great late season for the salt and as I was heading off cape with both trout and striper gear in tow I contemplated going striper fishing but in the end opted to do a little trout fishing since at the time I had not done much of that this fall. I pulled into the almost empty parking area and immediately with a glimpse of the pond viewable could tell the winds were just right. A very light SE breeze was blowing straight into the beach below. Perfect.

I as I made my way down to the water and was surveying the scene I noticed a couple of older probably retired guys to the west dunkin bait and one bending the others ear pretty good. That was about it for fisherman. Then over to the East were three young teen boys that turned out to be working on some kind of video skit for school project. They turned out to be my entertainment between fish.

I had a black gartside sparrow already tied on my leader so I opted to just strip off the line needed and start working that which turned out to be a good choice. First cast after getting the coils out of the line and getting the sparrow thoroughly wetted I hooked into a very fine fat rainbow. A testament to the quality of the fish in this pond. The fish started ripping line though my finger tips with me struggling to keep from breaking it off. All of a sudden I had the attention of both the older bait fisherman and the three teens. It took a while to get the fish under control with the 8ft Orvis Western 2wt (really a 4wt) and the 6x tippet. But I managed not to screw it up and got the fish to net for a photo. It was so nice and fat I comtemplated keeping it for supper. Two problems; I hadn't told the wife I was stopping to fish  :lol and I forgot I didn't have a stringer. So off she went back to the pond.

It was about this time the midges just started to emerge in force from the pond and another fly fisherman arrived. I was fishing the North end of the pond so the light SE breeze was blowing midges the length of the pond into the beach where I was and if one were paying attention you could see fish rolling in close to the shore eating them along the whole shoreline to my east.

I was in the West corner and the other the fly fisherman hiked down to the far East corner where there was a lot of fish now rising where midges were stacking up due to a very subtle wind line. In between us both fish were rising and rolling in the shallows the whole length of the cove.

It was now evident I lucked into one of the best midge hatches I had ever experienced on this pond. I have stopped here at least once every fall for the last few years and had heard this pond is very good but never lucked into a good feed until today.

The fishing was excellent as mentioned right from the start and I ended up with six nice rainbows the best being the first one in the first three photos below. After getting two fish on the black sparrow I switched to a small number six midge emerger that worked for my other fish. I didn't bother to take photos of them all. The other two photos give you an idea of the beach layout and you can see the other fly fisherman working the far Eastern corner. If you look close in both these bottom two shots you can see rises.

Towards the end at dusk there were so many midges it was difficult to get a hit. That and the wind let up and the midges were now spread out not piling up on the beach as much. I worked through a variety of flies at dusk to get to fish number seven but that never materialized but in the end a fine outing at one of the capes premier kettle ponds.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2017, 09:38:41 AM by jeffsod »
Logged

jeffsod

  • Baby effin Wheel Kid
  • *******
  • Karma: +1/-1
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1929
  • Newbie
Re: November Trout
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2017, 09:51:06 AM »

The next couple of photos comes from a small stocked stocked kettle pond I frequent during the week due to its proximity to my work. I can be on the water within fifteen minutes of leaving my office so it gets a fair amount of my weeknight fishing in the late fall due to the limited daylight.

Of all the kettle ponds in SE MA it is not my favorite as far as midge hatches go for the late fall but it does seem to hold some fish over through the summer and winter from prior stockings and it often surprises you with some excellent warm water catches. This like many of the ponds in the area is a water supply for several cranberry bogs so it is not uncommon to find a pile of cranberries washed up along the 'high' tide mark as you hike the shoreline in the late fall. Also it is not unusual to stop by one day and then the next to find the water down two feet from the previous day due to the bog owners flooding for harvest. The same goes true in reverse. It can go up two feet from one day to the next. This also can draw the attention of the fish as you now have currents from the water getting pumped out or draining back in. This brings me to this day's report.

This outing was just before daylight saving change and it was getting dark already about five thirty six o'clock so I had very light time but opted to hike to the South side of the pond which adds a few minutes to the start. As I hiked around the to the South from the access I noticed a strong flow of water coming back into the pond from the South bogs. Winds were strong from the South that day which was part of my decision to fish the area using the protection of the looming white pines that tower and  grow up to the waters edge. That and I had intel thanks to Bamboo Mike the fishing had been good over in the area.

One of the best by catches of the pond is it's huge bluegills. If the trout don't oblige the big bluegills usually do. The average size is bigger than my hand so not bad.

The fishing was steady this evening for bluegills as the warm late fall weather had been unusually warm and the fish were taking advantage. I was wading and working my way down and back along the shoreline hoping to pick up a trout or two in between the bluegills. My first bluegill surprised me as it took in an area I was getting a steady pick of big bluegills when all of a sudden I had a fight on my hands. The bluegills bulldog using their plate like profile against the rod but the trout immediately start thrashing on the surface so I knew right away.

All of my fish as you can see in the first photo this evening were taken on an olive wooly bugger. I had been fishing over in Plymouth at one of favorite ponds the weekend before and the olive wooly bugger was the fly that did the most damage. I fish them small in the size 14 size. The weekend before I was using two small ones purchased at the bears den but had broke them both off. Luckily I had material to put some together on my own. Not ideal hackle as the 'bugger' pack or strung saddle I had was intended more for size 8-10 not 14 flies. I don't know if it is true or not but I seem to like the smaller buggers for late fall trout. I made due and you can see the fish were ok with it  :lol

After landing the trout I started to see a good amount of rise activity to my west along the edge of the bog out flow so I was fishing and working my way down the shore to my left in that direction. The sun had set and civil twilight was nearing its end when I got slammed by a solid hit on the olive wooly bugger. This one had me confused though. Having caught a number of bluegills I knew it wasn't one of them and it certainly was not a trout. The whole time while fighting I was watching the fish intently as I worked it in closer to determine what I had. The fish took after a couple of strips and the Orvis Western 2wt puts it out a good ways so it took some careful coaxing on the 5-6x tippet (can't recall which exactly) before I got it close enough to I.D. the fish.  Much to my surprise it was one of the largest Calico Bass or 'Crappie's I have caught in some time and for sure the only one from this pond making it by default the largest. If this pond didn't have such a strong presence of cranberry bogs I might have even kept and ate this fish as it had some fine fillets.

This did not end my evening though as I worked further West to the outflow it was a non-stop pick of bluegills some big some small but a fine way to end the evening. Never did find another trout but not a bad end to the day...
« Last Edit: November 23, 2017, 10:07:43 AM by jeffsod »
Logged

jeffsod

  • Baby effin Wheel Kid
  • *******
  • Karma: +1/-1
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1929
  • Newbie
Re: November Trout
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2017, 10:19:55 AM »


In the previous post I mentioned having good luck with the olive wooly buggers the prior weekend in Plymouth. This goes back to the last week in October and I was fishing with friend Dennis and another fellow in the Eastern cove of the pond. A light West breeze had some midges in the center of the cove where the other gentleman was fishing with some success (3) but Dennis and I had no luck.

Eventually after a couple hours flogging the water with no success and with building winds and deteriorating weather we opted to move around to the SW side that offered a point we would fish in the lee of the building winds. There was lots of debris in the water with leaves and pine needles but there appeared to be some fish in the area.

We ran into one serious fisherman who had come from Long Pond and stopped by to sample the fishing. He was loaded for bear as they say and on a mission for some quality trout. He had two spin rods both light tackle but one with a Thomas buoyant spoon and another rigged to fish chubs of which he had a small bucket in tow along with a fly rod with some oversized buggers with long tails. He complained he was getting nothing on the spin rods and the buggers the fish kept short striking.

I took this as a que that there were fish where he was at the point and went directly there and immediately hooked up (see fish below) using a normal tailed olive wooly bugger (size 14). That was a turning point for the afternoon and we started catching some fish. The next fish came by accident when I roll cast my line to prepare for my next cast a big rainbow ate it. Ha! Fish one. The realization was funny as the line started wiggling and I was like Huh???

In the end the size 14 wooly bugger was the fly of the day and the fish were eating in this area quite well. I think due in part to it's proximity to deep water drop off.


 
Logged

Shakeyfly

  • No Time to Fish
  • Administrator
  • Baby effin Wheel Kid
  • *****
  • Karma: +104/-1
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 7500
  • Huge Member
    • The Rules of Fly Fishing
Re: November Trout
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2017, 01:30:12 PM »

 awesome reports! I love thise gartside sparrows
Logged
"A desperate and lasting sadness descends on you when you realize you're a fisherman who's not gonna catch fish today."
John Gierach, Good Flies

ginclear

  • Baby effin Wheel Kid
  • *******
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1836
  • Always Learning
    • Gin Clear
Re: November Trout
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2017, 06:59:14 PM »

Great reports and fish, Jeff. Thanks for posting these.
Logged
Instagram @ginclear
Twitter @deanwo
http://gin-clear.blogspot.com

Chris M

  • Propeller Assassin
  • Administrator
  • Baby effin Wheel Kid
  • *****
  • Karma: +4/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3400
Re: November Trout
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2017, 07:34:04 PM »

Awesome pics of the rises Jeff.  Love those sandy shoreline spring fed kettle cape ponds
Logged

ginclear

  • Baby effin Wheel Kid
  • *******
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1836
  • Always Learning
    • Gin Clear
Re: November Trout
« Reply #10 on: November 25, 2017, 08:22:47 AM »

Matt (my son) and I went out yesterday afternoon to a local trout stream. This is not a river I frequent locally as it seems that whenever I go there everyone else is catching and I'm skunked. In fact, I think I have only caught a fallfish in this river in the 1/2 dozen times visited over the last 5+ years. Needless to say, my expectations where low, but Matt & I wanted to visit a different river from where we typically go.
We parked and took the short hike in around 1 PM. This is a fly fishing only/catch & release stream so the most worn trail and river entry spots are where the pressured fish can be found. I dropped into a riffle and started swinging an olive slumpbuster. Matt went downstream and was set up with a double nymph rig. After a couple casts, I felt a bump (or ticked the bottom). A few more casts and I had one on. A 13" colorful rainbow.

I crossed the river and kept working the seam a bit further downstream. I made a couple casts upstream and let the slumpbuster dead drift. I fooled another fish with this technique but dropped him at my feet probably due to a poor hookset. A few more dead drifts had me snagged on the bottom and loosing my fly to the river gods. I tied on a double nymph rig with bobber but did not find any more in this run. Matt had moved upstream after having zero bumps below me. As I got out of the stream to join him, I noticed my right boot was real loose. I removed my gravel guard to retighten the Simms Boa lace and noticed it had snapped. It took a bit, but I was able to tie a square knot in the wire lace and tightened the boot enough to keep it on my foot. I never had much confidence in the boa lace system and after two seasons of light use, this one failed.
We bushwacked our way upstream a ways, but did not find any productive water.

We walked a back downstream further than where we started to a big pool. I tied on a black slumpbuster and started working the pool. After a couple casts the fly got hit and the cast after I was hooked up with another rainbow.

The sun was getting low, so we hiked out and headed home. It's been a while since I've landed a trout, so it was a welcomed change of pace from the salt.
« Last Edit: November 25, 2017, 09:51:14 AM by ginclear »
Logged
Instagram @ginclear
Twitter @deanwo
http://gin-clear.blogspot.com

jeffsod

  • Baby effin Wheel Kid
  • *******
  • Karma: +1/-1
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1929
  • Newbie
Re: November Trout
« Reply #11 on: November 25, 2017, 09:42:22 AM »


Great report Dean!

Nice to see a shot of the water since I have heard about it but never laid eyes on it. Those are some nice looking rainbows! Yesterday was a perfect late fall day for some trout fishing.

I hit one of my favorite fall ponds a for a couple hours. The midges were coming off pretty good but the trout didn't seem too keyed in on them until after the sunset and even then only a couple of fish were slurping them. I did manage one nice rainbow so at least I wasn't skunked.
Logged

jeffsod

  • Baby effin Wheel Kid
  • *******
  • Karma: +1/-1
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1929
  • Newbie
Re: November Trout
« Reply #12 on: November 28, 2017, 08:07:29 PM »



Tonight I checked the weather report before heading out for home and noticed the winds were light and I had just enough time to make a stop and fish for about forty minutes before it would be too dark.

Temperatures were rather cool but it was a beautiful evening. So I hit the ground running so to speak about four ten walking briskly towards my intended spot. But as soon as I got to the waters edge I was drawn into the water by a couple of nearby rises in the calm waters. So I waded out waist deep trying to get closer to them and worked the area for about ten minutes. Then I started to re-think it as darkness was descending and quickly moved onto the original destination.

Upon arrival at the North end of the pond I saw a rise immediately and started to think I should have skipped the first stop. Then as I waded out I noticed surface activity to my East in really close to shore. This area of the pond has a rocky bottom which was quite popular with the false spawners last fall. I have not really seen any of this kind of activity this fall until today. There they were though a few fish in maybe two feet of water circling around each other. 

I cast the size 14 midge fly I had on over in the area trying to circle around the exact spot trying not to spook them but ultimately probably did as they quieted down for a while. So I opted to switch to a smaller midge emerger that has worked under these conditions in the past in a size 16. That and I worked a different area to give them a rest for a few casts.

Sure enough they started in again and I again worked the edges but in the end got nothing. At this point daylight was fading and I was just about out of time. I decided I wanted to work more out front to the South and in order to do that I had to move West just about ten feet to get a better back cast. I moved over and once I got the line re-sorted I cast straight out as far as I could. As I was working the fly back in slowly I was realizing I was just about out of daylight when it got smashed and the placid waters erupted into a frenzy where my fly was. Yes, fish on!

The fish seemed a little different than usual rainbows I have been getting lately and I was more than curious as the fish drew closer but still it was too dark to tell. It wasn't until I was able to slide it in the net I realized I just caught my first brown of the fall season and quite possibly the first ever at this pond! The fish is surely a holdover both because I know they didn't stock browns this fall but also by looking at it. Never the less I was pretty psyched.

Could be my last November trout....
Logged

Shakeyfly

  • No Time to Fish
  • Administrator
  • Baby effin Wheel Kid
  • *****
  • Karma: +104/-1
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 7500
  • Huge Member
    • The Rules of Fly Fishing
Re: November Trout
« Reply #13 on: November 28, 2017, 08:12:59 PM »

that's awesome. I'm in South Carolina right now for work with the family in Tow, and I'm hearing some amazing stories down here of redfishing. I need to get out and fish one more time before the year is up.
Logged
"A desperate and lasting sadness descends on you when you realize you're a fisherman who's not gonna catch fish today."
John Gierach, Good Flies

ginclear

  • Baby effin Wheel Kid
  • *******
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1836
  • Always Learning
    • Gin Clear
Re: November Trout
« Reply #14 on: November 28, 2017, 08:35:18 PM »

Way to work it, Jeff. Congrats on the brown as well!
Logged
Instagram @ginclear
Twitter @deanwo
http://gin-clear.blogspot.com
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up